THURSDAY!

L.Y.A.O. with others while they L.O.L.

via a Classic Comedy Film Series by the PS International Film Society…

Some Like it Hot, 1959

at the Palm Springs Art Museum‘s Annenberg Theater

101 Museum Drive Palm Springs, CA

6:00pm !

 

Synopsis

Two struggling musicians witness the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre and try to find a way out of the city before they are found and killed by the mob. The only job that will pay their way is an all girl band, so the two dress up as women. In addition to hiding, each has his own problems; One falls for another band member but can’t tell her his gender, and the other is pursued by a rich suitor who will not take “no” for an answer.

About the Director

Wilder became a screenwriter in the late 1920s while living in Berlin. After the rise of Adolf Hitler, Wilder, who was Jewish, left for Paris, where he made his directorial debut. He relocated to Hollywood in 1933, and in 1939 he had a hit as a co-writer of the screenplay to the screwball comedy Ninotchka. Wilder established his directorial reputation after helming Double Indemnity(1944), a film noir he co-wrote with mystery novelist Raymond Chandler. Wilder earned the Best Director and Best ScreenplayAcademy Awards for the adaptation of a Charles R. Jackson story The Lost Weekend, about alcoholism. In 1950, Wilder co-wrote and directed the critically acclaimed Sunset Boulevard.

From the mid-1950s on, Wilder made mostly comedies.[2] Among the classics Wilder created in this period are the farces The Seven Year Itch (1955) and Some Like It Hot (1959), satires such as The Apartment (1960), and the romantic comedy Sabrina(1954). He directed fourteen different actors in Oscar-nominated performances. Wilder was recognized with the AFI Life Achievement Award in 1986. In 1988, Wilder was awarded the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. In 1993, he was awarded theNational Medal of Arts. Wilder holds a significant place in the history of Hollywood censorship for expanding the range of acceptable subject matter.

Trailer

 

 for more information, please visit:

www.psmuseum.org

 

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