Being a resident of the Coachella Valley in the summer isn’t always fabulous…in fact, some days are just flat-out hard.  One of my favorite ways to avoid the heat, and all the painful reality that often comes with it, is by leaving it all behind (or outside) as I relax in the theater and travel back in time through stories told via the silver screen.  In the theater is where you can sink deep into your seat, soak up the air conditioning and travel to far-a-way lands all while watching a fantastic film.  This Thursday, the Palm Springs Art Museum invites you to join them on a quick trip inside their time machine to the thunderous 1970’s!  Share a few laughs with Woody Allen in his cult classic, Annie Hall. 

Don’t get left behind, details below:

Annie Hall Woody Allen 

This Thursday evening….

…time travel back into the 1970’s

via a cult classic…

Annie Hall, 1977 

at the Palm Springs Art Museum‘s Annenberg Theater

101 Museum Drive Palm Springs, CA

6:00pm !

FREE!

xxx
xxx

Review Summary

Woody Allen‘s romantic comedy of the Me Decade follows the up and down relationship of two mismatched New York neurotics. Jewish comedy writer Alvy Singer (Allen) ponders the modern quest for love and his past romance with tightly-wound WASP singer Annie Hall (Diane Keaton, née Diane Hall). The twice-divorced Alvy knows that it’s not easy to find a mate when the options include pretentious New York intellectuals and lifestyle-obsessed Rolling Stone writers, but la-di-dah-ing Annie seems different. Along the rocky road of their coupling, Allen/Alvy weigh in on such topics as endless therapy, movies vs. TV, the absurdity of dating rituals, anti-Semitism, drugs, and, in one of the best set pieces, repressed Midwestern WASP insanity vs. crazy Brooklyn Jewish boisterousness. Annie wants to move to Los Angeles to find that fame that finally does in the relationship — but not before Alvy gets in a few digs at vacuous, mantra-fixated California. Originally entitled Anhedonia (the inability to enjoy oneself), Annie Hall blended the slapstick and fantasy from such earlier Allen films as Sleeper (1973) and Bananas (1971) with the more autobiographical musings of his stand-up and written comedy, using an array of such movie techniques as talking heads, splitscreens, and subtitles. Within these gleeful formal experiments and sight gags, Allen and co-writer Marshall Brickman skewered 1970s solipsism, reversing the happy marriage of opposites found in classic screwball comedies. Hailed as Allen’s most mature and personal film, Annie Hall beat out Star Warsfor Best Picture and also won Oscars for Allen as director and writer and for Keaton as Best Actress; audiences enthusiastically responded to Allen’s take on contemporary love and turned Keaton’s rumpled menswear into a fashion trend. ~ Lucia Bozzola, Rovi.”

– via New York Time’s Movies, Lucia Bozzola

 xxx

annie hall woody allen

bb

About the Director

“Woody Allen was born December 1, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York. As a young boy he became intrigued with magic tricks and playing the clarinet, two hobbies that he continues today.

He broke into show business at age 15 when he started writing jokes for a local paper, receiving $200 a week. He later moved on to write jokes for talk shows but felt that his jokes were being wasted. His agents, Charles Joffe and Jack Rollins, convinced him to start doing stand-up and telling his own jokes. Reluctantly he agreed and, although he initially performed with such fear of the audience that he would cover his ears when they applauded his jokes, he eventually became very successful at stand-up.

After performing on stage for a few years, he was approached to write a script for Warren Beatty to star in: “What’s New Pussycat?” and would also have a moderate role as a character in the film. As production was ongoing for the film, Woody gave himself more and better lines and left Beatty with less compelling dialogue. Beatty inevitably quit the project and was replaced by Peter Sellers, who demanded all the best lines and screen time. It was from this experience that Woody realized that he could not work on a film without complete control over its production.

Woody’s theoretical directorial debut was in “What’s Up, Tiger Lily?”; a Japanese spy flick that he dubbed over with his own comedic dialogue about spies searching for the secret recipe for egg salad. His real directorial debut came the next year in the mockumentary “Take the Money and Run.” He has written, directed and, more often than not, starred in about a film a year ever since while simultaneously writing more than a dozen plays and several books of comedy.

While best known for his romantic comedies Annie Hall (1977) and Manhattan (1979), Woody has made many transitions in his films throughout the years, transitioning from his “early, funny ones” of “Bananas,” “Love and Death” and “Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex But Were Afraid To Ask;” to his more storied and romantic comedies of “Annie Hall,” “Manhattan” and “Hannah and Her Sisters;” to the Bergman-esque films of “Stardust Memories” and “Interiors;” and then on to the more recent, but varied works of “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” “Husbands and Wives,” “Mighty Aphrodite,” “Celebrity” and “Deconstructing Harry;” and finally to his film of the last decade, which vary from the light comedy of “Scoop,” to the self-destructive darkness of “Match Point” and, most recently, to the cinematically beautiful tale of “Vicky Cristina Barcelona.”

Although his stories and style have changed over the years, he is regarded as one of the best filmmakers of our time because of his views on art and his mastery of filmmaking.”

 – via IMDb Mini Biography By: Michael Castrignano 

gggg

xxxxx

Film Trailer

xx111111111v11111111

xxxxx

For more information, please visit:

www.psmuseum.org

 

Comments

comments