Being a resident of the Coachella Valley in the summer isn’t always fabulous…in fact, some days are just flat-out hard.  One of my favorite ways to avoid the heat, and all the painful reality that often comes with it, is by leaving it all behind (or outside) as I relax in the theater and travel back in time through stories told via the silver screen.  In the theater is where you can sink deep into your seat, soak up the air conditioning and travel to far-a-way lands all while watching a fantastic film.  

This Thursday, the Palm Springs Art Museum invites you to join them on a quick trip to Japan for Akira Kurosawa’s period drama that is inspired by western film genre, Yojimobo. 

Don’t get left behind, details below:

 

This Thursday evening….

…we travel to Japan for

Yojimbo, 1961 

at the Palm Springs Art Museum‘s Annenberg Theater

101 Museum Drive Palm Springs, CA

6:00pm !

FREE!

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Review Summary

This period drama tells the story of a man who arrives in a small town were competing crime lords try to hire the deadly newcomer as a bodyguard (“yojimbo in Japanese). The film’s look and themes were in part inspired by the western film genre and the characters are reminiscent of Kurosawa’s own Seven Samurai (1954).

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About the Director

“After training as a painter (he storyboards his films as full-scale paintings), Kurosawa entered the film industry in 1936 as an assistant director, eventually making his directorialdebut with Sanshiro Sugata (1943). Within a few years, Kurosawa had achieved sufficient stature to allow him greater creative freedom. Drunken Angel (1948)–“Drunken Angel”–was the first film he made without extensive studio interference, and marked his first collaboration with Toshirô Mifune. In the coming decades, the two would make 16 movies together, and Mifune became as closely associated with Kurosawa’s films as was John Wayne with the films of Kurosawa’s idol, John Ford. After working in a wide range of genres, Kurosawa made his international breakthrough film Rashomon (1950) in 1950. It won the top prize at the Venice Film Festival, and first revealed the richness of Japanese cinema to the West. The next few years saw the low-key, touching Ikiru (1952) (Living), the epic Seven Samurai (1954), the barbaric, riveting Shakespeare adaptation Throne of Blood (1957), and a fun pair of samurai comediesYojimbo (1961) and Sanjuro (1962). After a lean period in the late 1960s and early 1970s, though, Kurosawa attempted suicide. He survived, and made a small, personal, low-budget picture with Dodes’ka-den (1970), a larger-scale Russian co-production Dersu Uzala (1975) and, with the help of admirers Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas, the samurai tale Kagemusha (1980), which Kurosawa described as a dry run forRan (1985), an epic adaptation of Shakespeare’s “King Lear.” He continued to work into his eighties with the more personal Dreams (1990),Rhapsody in August (1991) and Madadayo (1993). Kurosawa’s films have always been more popular in the West than in his native Japan, where critics have viewed his adaptations of Western genres and authors (William ShakespeareFyodor DostoevskyMaxim Gorky and Evan Hunter) with suspicion – but he’s revered by American and European film-makers, who remade Rashomon (1950) as The Outrage (1964), Seven Samurai (1954), as The Magnificent Seven (1960), Yojimbo (1961), as A Fistful of Dollars (1964) and The Hidden Fortress (1958), as Star Wars(1977).”

– via IMDB.com

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Film Trailer

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For more information, please visit:

www.psmuseum.org

 

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