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Are you a Bank of America card holder?  Lucky you.  This weekend you can visit the Palm Springs Art Museum (both the Palm Springs and Palm Desert locations) for free!  Just show (not swipe) your card when you enter the museum.  More details below.

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Through a special grant from Bank of America, the Palm Springs Art Museum and Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert, join more than 150 other cultural institutions throughout the United States in offering free access to some of America’s favorite museums and cultural institutions on the first full weekend of every month.

To qualify for Museums on Us free admission, you must be a Bank of America or Merrill Lynch card customer. Simply present your Bank of America or Merrill Lynch credit or debit card along with a photo ID to gain free general admission to the museum or any other participating institution. Cardholders only; guests are not eligible for free admission. The Palm Springs Art Museum is honored to participate in this program that brings new audiences and increased attention to art museums, science and history museums, and other cultural institutions. For a full list of participating museums, please visit theMuseums on Us website here.

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palm springs art museum

*inside the Palm Springs Art Museum

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Palm Springs Art Museum

101 Museum Drive

Palm Springs, CA 92263

www.psmuseum.org

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Palm Springs Art Museum – Palm Desert

72567 HWY 111

Palm Desert, CA 92260

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Hours of Weekend Operation:

Saturday & Sunday from 10am – 5pm

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Current Exhibitions
(*last day of exhibition is 10/6/13)

palm springs art museum

Insights into Architecture

This exhibition is inspired by Ezra Stoller (1915-2004), a student of both architecture and industrial design, who began his career as a photographer in the late 1930s. His 1939 World’s Fair, Finnish Pavilion, Queens, New York, designed by Alvar Aalto, launched his career and his recognition as an acute observer of space and form. His photographs of work by architects Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen, Louis Kahn, and Marcel Breuer demonstrate his finely tuned sensitivity to light and shadow, translucency and solid form. Each of Stoller’s photographs is a study of the architect’s expression of modern architecture, as crisp as the buildings themselves.

Stoller’s career spanned the arc of modern architecture from the late 1930s to the 1970s and through his published photographs the public learned about important buildings from New York to California. The examples on view are gifts of Dr. J. Patrick and Patricia A. Kennedy. Additional photographs by other architectural photographers in our permanent collection will accompany this exhibition.

This exhibition is organized by the Palm Springs Art Museum.

– See more at: http://www.psmuseum.org/palm-springs/exhibition/insights-architecture/#sthash.ph2Moo5c.dpuf

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George Catlin, Buffalo Bull, Grazing on the Prairie, 1832-1833, oill on canvas, © Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison, Jr.

George Catlin, Buffalo Bull, Grazing on the Prairie, 1832-1833, oill on canvas, © Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison, Jr.

George Ctalin’s American Buffalo

George Catlin’s American Buffalo exhibits forty paintings dating from 1832 to 1848 from the artist’s original “Indian Gallery.” The exhibition includes eleven full-length portraits of Plains Indians and twenty-nine paintings of his observation of buffalo and their integration into all aspects of Native American life. These paintings are from the permanent collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

 

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Palm Springs Art Museum – Palm Desert

ACROSS DIMENSIONS: GRAPHICS AND SCULPTURE FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1988-91, concrete, Gift of Bettina and Donald Bryant* Donald Judd, Untitled, 1988-91, concrete, Gift of Bettina and Donald Bryant

Artists often work with different kinds of media, even though they may be better known primarily for one mode of expression. Taking the museum’s installation of permanent collection sculpture in the Faye Sarkowsky Sculpture Garden as a point of departure, this exhibition considers the creative drive to work in a variety of formats. Long before a bronze is cast, aluminum is welded, or steel is painted, artists may conceptualize their ideas in two dimensional formats, or work in smaller scales. A drawing might inform one’s sculptural practice as much as a monumental work might inspire an experiment in print. Donald Judd’s concrete giants were originally explored through woodcut prints. Dan Namingha, known for his abstract sculptures derived from Native American symbols, has long produced colorful, collage-inspired prints. Some artists, such as Henry Moore, fluidly move from mammoth to small scale working in bronze or on paper. The juxtaposition of sculpture alongside prints and drawings by Alberto Giacometti, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Arneson, and Willem de Kooning, among others, shows how working in multiple dimensions is a natural result of artistic curiosity and an exploratory inability to remain tethered to one distinct genre. By bringing art of varied physical formats in dialogue, this exhibition reveals the importance of play in creative practice and the never-ending pursuit of the new by modern and contemporary artists.

This exhibition is organized by the Palm Springs Art Museum.

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palm springs art museum - palm desert

*Palm Springs Art Museum – Palm Desert

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for more information, please visit:

http://www.psmuseum.org

http://museums.bankofamerica.com

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