There are a couple really amazing art exhibitions happening this weekend that we thought you’d be interested in checking out.  From street art, to sculpture, to fine art…these are all really jaw dropping and truly inspiring.

Get out there and see what it’s all about – the magic and the message!

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Gallery 446

Palm Springs, CA

gallery 446 in palm springs

gallery 446 in palm springs

If You Want to See Stars Look in the Sky. By Gregory Siff & Mar!  32" x 72" Acrylic Paint on stretched canvas, 2013

If You Want to See Stars Look in the Sky.
By Gregory Siff & Mar!

32″ x 72″ Acrylic Paint on stretched canvas, 2013

Ultra Magnetic By DEFER 36" x 36" Acrylic on canvas, 2013

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Heather James Fine Art

Palm Desert, CA

heather james fine art palm desert

David Mach (b. 1956)
Straight Up (Coathanger Man)

Wire coat-hangers
115 x 40 x 33 in.
Executed in 2004

heather james fine art palm desert

On the Rocks (Coathanger Woman)
Wire coat-hangers
105 x 67 x 48 in.
Executed in 2004

heather james fine art

About:

David Mach was born in Scotland in 1956 and went on to study at the Duncan Jordanstone College of Art in Dundee, Scotland and the Royal College of Art, London. Since the launch of his career in the early 1980s, David Mach has achieved international acclaim as a celebrated sculptor and installation artist. In 1988, he was nominated for the prestigious Turner Prize. In 2000, Mach took a position as Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy of Arts and continues to develop his innovative style with public installations and performance art.

Assemblages of mass-produced found objects often form the basis of Mach’s sculptures and installations, incorporating everything from magazines, newspapers, car tires, matches and coat hangers. Early in his career, Mach began creating representations of human and animal faces constructed out of matchsticks with the colored match heads arranged so as to create the surface of the face. After accidentally igniting one such work, Mach will now sometimes ignite his matchstick sculptures as a sort of performance art. The coathangers are made in a similar way to the matchheads, using traditional sculptural techniques, a figure or object is modeled in clay, molded, cast and then the coathangers are laboriously shaped, fitted and welded round the plastic shape.

According to Mach, “an artist must be an ideamonger responding to all kinds of physical locations, social and political environments, to materials, to processes, to timescales and budgets. I also believe that sculpture just about encompasses everything – a painting can be a sculpture, a TV ad can be a sculpture, a dance, a performance, a film, a video – all of these kinds of art and many more can be sculpture. When I have ideas I want to make them, and not just some of them, but all of them. As a result of that my sculpture covers a multitude of sins. I like to work in as many different materials as possible. It’s no understatement to say I am a materials junkie – jumping from highly-painted realistic cast fibreglass pieces to sculpture with coathangers, to a thatched barn roof laced with fibre-optics to designs for camera obscuras (or at least the buildings to house them) and layouts for parks.”

Mach was commissioned for a number of public sculptures in the UK and has exhibited extensively. His work exists in public collections at the Tate Britain; Tate Liverpool; the National Portrait Gallery; the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art; Scottish National Portrait Gallery; Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow; the British Council collection among many others.

He has work in many international collections including Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; McMaster Museum, Hamilton, Ontario; Museé Leon Dierx, Reunion Island; Kawasaki City Museum, Tokyo; Museum of Art, Auckland; FRAC du Rhones-Alpes, France; FRAC de Franche-Comté; Museé d’art Contemporain, Dole, France; Museé van Hedendaagse kunst, Antwerp; de Werf, Aalst, Belgium; UBS, Geneva; Microsoft, Seattle; Hasbro Inc, New York.

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Palm Springs Art Museum

Palm Springs, CA

(Opening on Saturday, October 26th)

RICHARD DIEBENKORN, THE BERKELEY YEARS  at the palm springs art museum

About:

Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966 is being organized in a collaboration with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Palm Springs Art Museum (PSAM). A fully illustrated catalogue published by Yale University Press will accompany the exhibition, with essays by Timothy Anglin Burgard, the Ednah Root Curator-in-Charge of American Art at FAMSF, and Steven Nash, Executive Director of the PSAM, with contributions from Emma Acker, Curatorial Assistant for American Art at FAMSF.

Richard Diebenkorn achieved national and international acclaim during his lifetime and is considered one of California’s finest 20th century artists. His work has been the subject of several retrospective exhibitions, numerous smaller exhibitions, and many articles and critical reviews. This exhibition will be the first to examine the productive period between 1953 to 1966 while Diebenkorn and his family lived in Berkeley, California. It was a remarkable period of exploration and innovation in his art marked by vivid abstract landscapes characterizing the rich, natural conditions of the Bay Area, followed by a sudden shift to a representational style that played a leading role in the Bay Area Figurative Movement, which finally gave way again to abstraction after the artist’s move to southern California in 1966.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN, THE BERKELEY YEARS  at the palm springs art museum

These transformations represent one of the most interesting chapters in post-war American art, and Diebenkorn produced many of his most iconic works during this time. No previous investigations of his work have focused precisely on the motivations for his dramatic shifts of style, or what these different modes meant to him as expressive vehicles. A significant cataloguing project now underway has brought to light many works from this period that have long remained little known, and this exhibition will contain a major sampling of such works. Produced by the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, the catalogue raisonne will identify all Diebenkorn’s work.

Early formative years as a student and teacher at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco provided Diebenkorn with strong influences from Clyfford Still and Mark Rothko who were instructors there. By 1953 Diebenkorn was living in the Berkeley Hills and had developed his own expressive abstract style, marked by a fluid, gestural handling of both line and thick impastos of paint, an expansive sense of space and rich earthen colors. He was inspired by the striking landscape vistas of the Bay Area, with their dramatic plunges, lush greens, and rich light. Over a three-year period he concentrated on a series of more than 50 paintings and hundreds of drawings and watercolors that synthesized these elements of nature in what came to be known as the Berkeley landscapes. Exhibitions of this work in San Francisco and New York gallery shows brought the beginnings of national attention to Diebenkorn’s work.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN, THE BERKELEY YEARS  at the palm springs art museum

Diebenkorn’s Berkeley landscapes are deserving of more focused attention than they have received through the years. The numerous drawings and watercolors associated with the paintings have never been studied in order to determine their formal relationship to the paintings. The evolution of some particularly dark and somber compositions requires more explanation in conjunction with the reasons the artist suddenly abandoned this style at a time of recognition. The exhibition and catalogue will bring new light to these matters and celebrate the joyful quality of the abstractions.

Starting with tentative figure and still-life paintings, Diebenkorn’s conversion from abstraction to figuration began in 1954-55, followed by impressively confident, large paintings of figures, still-lifes, landscapes and interiors. Diebenkorn explained the sudden shift in style, commenting that he was weary of the “super- emotional” approach required by the dynamism of the abstract work, and credited the influence of his friends David Park and Elmer Bischoff, both of whom had recently abandoned abstraction for figuration. Other factors influencing the change were his growing interest in figural drawing, a strong interest in Henri Matisse and Pierre Bonnard, as well as artists Edgar Degas and the German Expressionists, and a new-found concern for the human psychology of his own paintings. Richard Diebenkorn: the Berkeley Years will trace the development of these factors and examine the continued interaction but shifting balance, in nearly all of Diebenkorn’s work, between nature and abstraction, observation and artifice; a point dramatized at the conclusion of our study by growing evidence of a movement back towards abstraction in works produced in Southern California.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN, THE BERKELEY YEARS  at the palm springs art museum

The pendulum swing from abstraction to figuration in Diebenkorn’s work during the Berkeley period is a highly unusual if not unique occurrence in the history of American post-war art. It is, however, one of the most salient features of his art, and the Berkeley period clearly demonstrates its invigorating effect, as works in one mode draw from stylistic and formal resources in the other. Diebenkorn was able to enact these changes with no disruptions to the unity of his art or the basic principles of his artistic personality

This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, in collaboration with the Palm Springs Art Museum, and supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

The Palm Springs Art Museum presentation is supported by Diamond Sponsor: Museum Associates Council;Title Sponsor: National Endowment for the Arts; Presenting Sponsors: Sothebys, Myrna W. Kaplan, Faye and Herman Sarkowsky, Yvonne and Steve Maloney, Dorothy and Harold J. Meyerman, Pam and Jim Muzzy, Terra Foundation for American Art on behalf of board member Gloria Scoby; and Supporting Sponsors:Barbara and Jerry Keller, Donna MacMillan, Harold Matzner, Carol and Steve Nash, Gwendolyn Weiner, Beth Edwards Harris, Angie and Harvey Gerber, and Noel Hanford.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN, THE BERKELEY YEARS  at the palm springs art museum

CONTACT INFO:
760.322.4800 or email: info@psmuseum.org

DIRECTIONS:
Located in downtown Palm Springs on Museum Drive at Tahquitz Canyon Way, just west of N. Palm Canyon Drive

101 Museum Drive
Palm Springs, CA 92262-5659

WEBSITE:

www.psmuseum.org

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