The Coachella Valley Art Scene is proud to announce a new art show featuring the works of Sofia Enriquez and Jenn Stern.  Happening on Saturday, July 19th from 7pm-10pm at The Coachella Valley Art Scene Gallery 68571 East Palm Canyon Dr. Cathedral City, CA 92234.

.

Facebook Event Invite to the Show

.

.

the coachella valley art scene presents jenn stern and sofia enriquez

..

.

* * * * * 

Jennifer is inspired and influenced by the artistry of Camille Rose Garcia, Mark Ryden and Erte’. She has since collaborated and worked with artists such as Gary Garner, and James Franco.

Jennifer’s art centers on the human body, exploring repetition, proportion and the layering of figures and body parts to portray the dichotomy between the salaciously grotesque, and the enchanting erotic beauty we experience and feel. 

.

.

.

.

INTERVIEW : JENN STERN

By Jake Williams of The Coachella Valley Art Scene

.

.

Hi Jenn!  We hear that you’re pretty new to the Coachella Valley, so can you tell us a little bit about yourself? Where are you from?  

Although I have actually been out here in the Coachella Valley for about 2 years now, I still consider myself to be “new”. Mainly because I have been working out of my home and rarely go out. So I still feel like a tourist when people mention restaurants, bars, street names, etc, and I have no idea what there talking about. To sum it up, I just haven’t been out much at all for the past 2 years, so everything feels “new” to me everytime I leave my cave. I am originally from Chicago, and I moved out to Los Angeles when I was 18 to pursue fine art, and attended Otis College of Art and Design. 

.

How did you get your start in the visual arts?

How I got my start in visual arts has always been a difficult question for me to answer. For as long as I can remember i’ve had a special interest in art in general and have been painting and drawing since I was a little girl. What did really help push me to pursue my art was being fortunate enough to go to a highschool that had a huge and diverse art program. I was also very lucky to have parents that encouraged me to follow my passion, no matter what.

.

You’ve had quite the move, from Chicago, to Los Angeles, now here in Palm Springs. How have you felt living in the desert?  

Yes, I am proud to be from Chicago (and to be a mid-westerner at heart). I also cherish the 7ish years I lived in LA. Living in the desert has made me feel both extremes of hate and love; hating the summer heat, not having the accessibility to meet people like I did living LA or Chicago, and just being uncomfortable not living in a big city. On the other hand I love, for once, being so far removed from all the chaos of LA. The people here are so genuine and kind. I also am lucky enough to say I now live where my family used to vacation every year. I try to remind myself this when its 113 degrees! It was a slight culture shock moving to what I think is a “small town”. Everyone knows everyone and theres something very sacred and precious about that.

.

Art by Jenn Stern

.

What in the desert has inspired your creative process?

I would say that the extreme amount of solitude here, has inspired my creative process. I believe I went past the point of “cabin fever” and one day I woke up bursting at the seams with creative energy, motivation and ideas. That kind of creative inspiration is not something that is always with me. It comes and it goes, kind of like writers block. Most artists I know relate to the roller-coaster that is artistic drive. So when that inspiration hits me, I run with it because it could disappear at any second. Which makes it so exciting. Humans wouldn’t put any effort into their happiness or try living their lives to the fullest if they didn’t know that death is certain and could be creeping around the corner.

.

The art you make demonstrates an amazing use of color, and your representation of the human figure is quite visceral. Why do you choose to create this kind of work and explore these subjects?  

I have always seen the human body to be so beautiful and honestly quite disgusting and grotesque at the same time. I wanted to explore both of these ideas. 

.

Your artwork tends to take a turn towards the abstract, with unusually placed body parts, repetition of the female form, and a morphed representation of the body as a whole.

In general sex is abstract. The body is abstract. I use repetition a lot, because thats the way I see bodies and the way something such as the internet regurgitates sex or sexual imagery. It’s everywhere. In food and car commercials, in childrens’ movies, in fucking olympic gymnastics. It’s like putting all fashion magazines and porn together on fast-forward. Yes we are human and we are programed to procreate and are attracted to other people, bodies, bodyparts…. sex. But our culture, along with most cultures, do a fine job of shoving it in our faces, and quite honestly, I love it. We can’t ignore or repress our natural instincts and desires, so why ignore it?

.

Jenn Stern artist for The Coachella Valley Art Scene

.

While this is visually intriguing, this also creates a sort of erotic intensity. Is this something you seek to represent in your work?

Yes. Erotic, sexual, and even pornographic at times, I enjoy beautiful bodies enterlaced together. However, I feel that’s just the surface. Underneath that beauty and sensualty, there is always something much deeper, perhaps darker, an evil that comes out if observed closely…..

Theres just always been something so utterly vile in pornography while at the same time it can be hot and sexy, but if you peel off that layer, all sorts of demented emotions, intentions or even fears can come out. 

.

As the artist, what dialogue do you hope to create between your art and your audience?

 I hope that anyone who sees my work gets a strong feeling, whether it’s turning them on, grossing them out, or my favorite response; a sweet and sour combination of being sexually attracted to the piece while feeling disturbed at the same time- causing great internal confusion. Chaos, anger, and obsessive beauty all colliding together hopefully resulting in an orgasm followed by vomiting is usually my subconscious mantra when I paint.

.

You’ve worked with James Franco in the past…How was that? 

As a director, it was inspiring to see someone willing to dive into dirty wet sand and jump and run around just to get the right shot or angle. He didn’t care if he got injured, all that seemed to matter to him was getting it to be exactly what he wanted. I strive to take on that approach to everything in life. As an artist he brought me back to my roots. I think after art school I lost touch with being true to my artistic instincts. I thought since I was getting older, maybe I was loosing my edge and drifting away (becoming more conservative) about my art because I was scared…. After working with James on an artistic level, I realized that He’s not ashamed to be himself and make some of the weirdest craziest shit i’ve seen. (he would take that as a compliment im sure) That made me realize I need to just make what I want to make and not question anything else.  

.

After this show at the Coachella Valley Art Scene, what are you looking to do in the future? 

  • Paint until I die, or get arthritis in my hands (whichever comes first).
  • Eat a lot of sushi.
  • Pursue Audio Engineering and dissecting/rebuilding/creating music as a whole.
  • Leave America
  • Go to Thailand, and India for a few years-forever
  • Chill with elephants

.

.

Read more on Jenn:

http://www.jennstern.com

.

Jenn Stern artist for The Coachella Valley Art Scene

Comments

comments